Online Air Defense Radar Museum Guestbook

Radomes Guestbook V3.0


Welcome to the Online Air Defense Radar Museum. We hope you enjoy your visit, and that we have contributed a little something in the name of those who served.  Gene.

Please consider joining our new radar museum organization, The Air Force Radar Museum Association, Inc. AFRMA is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt non-profit Ohio Corporation. Our sole purpose is the creation and support of the National Air Defense Radar Museum at Bellefontaine, Ohio. Please visit our home page to join or donate to this cause. AFRMA, Inc. - The Air Force Radar Museum Association, Inc.. Follow the "Memberships" link on the AFRMA home page.



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2009

12/30/2009 00:00:00

Name: Samuel Camden
Email: scamden AT sbcglobal.net

I went through AC&W radar school at Keesler AFB, Mississippi, from November 1963 to October 1964. I was stationed at the 616th AC&W, Wasserkuppe, Germany, from October 1964 through December 1967. Next was the 636th AC&W, Condon, Oregon, from December 1967 through October 1968. At that time I madatorily cross-trained out of AC&W into ECM. Never set foot on another radar site during the rest of my 21 year career in the Air Force. I really missed a lot of the small unit comradarie that just didn't exist on the big bases.


12/29/2009 00:00:00

Name: Gerald Segroves
Email: segrovesgg AT comcast.net

John Tianen, Carl Wenberg et al: I suppose I became a radar operator without attending tech school largely because I made the mistake of believing a recruiting sergeant. As a then 17-year-old high school grad, I entered the AF on 5 Nov 1957 believing I would attend an electronics school after basic training, probably radio maintenance, since I had earned a diploma in radio & television servicing and had an amateur radio license, too. However, I quickly learned that an oral contract is no better than the paper it's written on. First, there was an offer during basic of becoming a survival instructor in Nevada (it had been tough for some of us in Tennessee and the rest of Appalachia in those days, you know! We certainly had struggled to survive!) Luckily, I had a TI who had been there, done that, and I could say no, thanks. I subsequently went through other testing, completed 11 weeks of basic training -- but still had no assignment. For nearly a month I stayed in a basic military training squadron as a freshly minted A/3C while assisting a tech sergeant in a training office. Astonishingly, at lunchtime he would hand me the keys to his nearly new Ford and let me drive to a chow hall! On 12 Feb 1958 four other A/3C's and myself were awarded primary AFSC 27010 and assigned to the 653rd AC&W in Louisiana on OJT. Thanks to on-the-job teaching of folks like SSgts. Mathew Alewine, Jerold Martin and Bobby Bishop, along with TSgt. Baxter Revels, I became a 27330A, followed by upgrade to 27350A on 10 Dec 1958. (Found those names and dates in my records -- my memory ain't that good!) Later I went to Canada before leaving the AF in '61 and the AF Reserve in '63 -- and I never saw Keesler. Happy New Year, y'all! (Now, tell me, has anyone seen MSgt. Name Deleted who used to be over at the recruiting office?)


12/29/2009 00:00:00

Name: John Tianen
Email: jtianen AT earthlink.net

It looks like Gerald Segroves "fell through the cracks" when he entered the Air Force. The military does screw up from time to time. When I went in, my test scores indicated that I could go into the electronics field (my choice) or any number of other career fields. During basic training, I was tested for language skills and was led to believe that I would go to language school to be an interpreter. I believed that was where I was destined to go right up until I received orders for radar school at Keesler. As I recall. troops used to say that the job your recruiter told you that you would be trained for was not always what you would wind up doing. It depended more on what the Air Force needed at the time you finished basic training. If they needed radar operators, that's what you would be. I'm just glad I didn't wind up as a morse intercept operator (MIO). We had guys in our barracks who went through that school, and they talked of having dreams in morse code. They also used to walk around the barracks talking in morse code. In case you don't know, MIOs listened to morse code traffic in front of a typewriter. Day in, and day out. Typing whatever they heard. It's one of those skills that don't have a civilian counterpart. On the plus side, you do learn to type. On the negative side, I've heard you can get a little loopy if you have to listen to morse code constantly.


12/29/2009 00:00:00

Name: David E. Casteel
Email: davidecasteel AT yahoo.com

For Hank Propp. Hank, I am certain that Tom and Gene will be more than happy to accept and make available in the On-line Museum any material you may have on the radio equipment and installations that you worked on. If the GATR and A/G radio operations appear to be short-changed, it is just that no one has provided the information to fill those gaps. If you've got photos of the GATR sites you worked at, send them in. Most of those functions were situated apart from the radar sites and thereby don't often show up in photos of them. Work crew photos are also welcome, especially when the people in them can be identified.

I was involved with radar (Radar Maintenance Officer) but we all recognized that without the radio communications to the aircraft our function was meaningless. And everyone knew that the support crews (food service, motor pool, security, supply, admin, etc.) are what kept us going. As others have said, we all contributed to success in the mission and all served equally.


12/29/2009 00:00:00

Name: Gerald Segroves
Email: segrovesgg AT comcast.net

Yes, John T., the military screws up from time to time. But I know I do too. In short, I'm glad we served when a lot of others didn't. Yes, I was angry and disappointed at first with my initial AF assignment, but I became determined to be one of the best at what I was ordered to do -- and help others do the same. To illustrate my point, I would humbly mention this: From Louisiana I went to a remote assignment in Canada with three letters of appreciation in my folder, including one from my squadron commander, an LTC who was a fighter pilot during the Korean War. I left Canada and active military duty in 1961 as an E-4 who had learned a lot and had a lot of memories. As a freshman at the University of Tennessee in the summer of 1962 -- five years after graduating high school -- I wrote a theme paper titled "Going Overseas by Greyhound Bus." My AF experiences and an English professor's positive reactions to descriptions mentioned in that paper changed my life. In 1967 I received a college degree, something I had needed for more success in the AF. In early 2008 I retired after 45 years in journalism, including stints with The Associated Press, a federal agency and East Tennessee's largest daily newspaper. So no, John, I didn't exactly fall "through the cracks" by missing tech school and learning via OJT. I just began heading down a road of "quite different experiences" in the process called "learning." Thanks for your service -- and that of others who might read this -- sincerely!


12/27/2009 00:00:00

Name: Tom McMillan
Email: t1840 AT aol.com

Was stationed with the 777th Radar Squadron 1976-1979.


12/27/2009 00:00:00

Name: john delaney
Email: johndelaney12 AT aol.com

Was stationed at St Anthony from around june 57 till aug 58 304X0 Tropo, Pole Vault system


12/26/2009 00:00:00

Name: donald g. beaty
Email: k1200b8e AT gmail.com

i was at sparrevohn dec/57dec/58 i was in transp. hauled many gal. of diesel and water to top camp and also to the radio shack opporunity? have several pictures of it and a few of the people from lime village. don beaty r/msgt usaf 8434462210


12/26/2009 00:00:00

Name: Gary Jacobs
Email: gaj7702 AT aol.com

If you would like to read the European edition of "Stars & Stripes" newspaper, check the link below. Bear in mind it begins with a credit union ad (I have no affiliation with that whatsoever), then you click through to the paper. I like the page turning and zoom features.

Interesting to see the issues and lifestyle some 30 plus years since my radar days.

http://edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk/Launch.aspx?referral=other&refresh=W1m9rB4031Ae&PBID=38d9706d-802f-4102-821a-db2745ae54a8&skip=


12/26/2009 00:00:00

Name: virgil renfroe
Email: virgilrenfroe AT att.net

Was at 708 utopia ,indian mountain jan 57 to jan 58 interesting year.


12/24/2009 00:00:00

Name: Willie Campbell
Email: wec2004 AT bellsouth.net

I take this oppunity to wish each and every one of you a MERRY CHRISTMAS and a very happy and BLESSED NEW YEAR.


12/24/2009 00:00:00

Name: lloyd melton
Email: ltmelton AT comcast.net

I was stationed at 717 acw at tatalina in jan76 to jan 77. I was the site carpenter and had a very unusal year there. From what i have read there has been no mention of new personnel arrival ceremonies.


12/23/2009 00:00:00

Name: Carl Wenberg
Email: zoombag AT comcast.net

In line with David Kegley remarks welcome to the AF after tours in ADC, I returned to the ZI from europe for assignment at McClellan AFB in AEW, went to Air Police office to get flt. line badge, in my salty (one piece) fatiques with my stripes stencled on and a cartoon drawing on my back(Turtle with headset and sparks)if the Air Pol. had hi blood press. he would have had a stroke we had words was going to get a DR so best part of valor I retreated to barracks and got in class A uniform case closed, found the real AF after being on sites back in the 50s


12/22/2009 00:00:00

Name: Scott Browning
Email: slbrowning AT comcast.net

I had the honor of serving in the ADC from 69-73 at the Almaden AFS, Boron AFS and Mill Valley AFS. If sure beat being in the REAL Air Force......


12/22/2009 00:00:00

Name: Bob Beatty
Email: bobbeatty323 AT earthlink.net

I served at the 921st AC&W, St. Anthony, Newfoundland from Jan through Dec '66 in radio maintenance (304xx). Merry Christmas all!


12/22/2009 00:00:00

Name: david kegley
Email: dkegley AT smwireless.net

Gene: I can't seem to find a route to send any information, so I'm sending this to you. I have a 1957 85th ADD year book, but don't where to send it to. If you could give me an address I would more than glad to donate it to the museum. my email address is, dkegley@smwireless.net thanks and good luck, keep the information coming, I enjoy reading the news and looking up the old sites. I spent my twent years in ADC. Have knowledge and some pictures of some of the places I was station, also am an old gap filler man and might be able to give you some information about them. I served from 1956 t0 1976. I'm retired and live in Othello WA. be waiting to hear from you or someone. Dave


12/21/2009 00:00:00

Name: Bobby Hall/S/sgt.
Email: bobbyh2002 AT comcast.net

I served at the 778th.AC&W Sqdn. (Havre, Montana) from Jan.1955 until Sept/1959.
It was a hell hole as far as the weather goes, however the people of Havre were great. Lots of fond memories.


12/21/2009 00:00:00

Name: Tom Page
Email: historian AT radomes.org

It's that time of year again -- NORAD and its various Air Defense Sectors will be tracking Santa on radar. See http://www.noradsanta.org/

Also: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-10418101-52.html

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/283744

http://readme.readmedia.com/Christmas-Eve-A-Special-Mission-for-New-York-Air-National-Guardsmen/1001190

http://www.projo.com/news/veteransjournal/Veterans_column_21_12-21-09_80GR7US_v8.361738f.html

http://www.gather.com/viewArticle.action?articleId=281474977950302&grpId=3659174697243100&nav=Groupspace

and many, many others.


12/21/2009 00:00:00

Name: BILL WELLS
Email: bdwells AT suddenlink.net

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL YOU SCOPEDOPES AND KNUCKLE BUSTERS!
AND REMEMBER WHILE YALL WERE ALL SNUG IN YOUR NICE WARM BLOCKHOUSE MY TROOPS AND I WERE OUT IN THE COLD GUARDING YOUR PRESENTS SANTA SENT YOU!!! LOL


12/19/2009 00:00:00

Name: Richard Dowler
Email: dickdowler AT socket.net

I signed roster for 689th AC&W Sq. Portland Int Airport and cant seem to edit it.I made mistake on time there.It should be Jan 54 to Jun 56.Im sure you can edit.
Merry Christmas to all
Dick Dowler


12/18/2009 00:00:00

Name: Billy Brooks
Email: bdbrooks73 AT gmail.com

Tom: It's been so long that I'm probably wrong, but I believe the program was called 'Cherry Tree'. Nineteen weeks of basic electronics and boom.......out to a site to get your 3 level and then 5 level via OJT.

John: My final tour was at Kume Jima Okinawa and as far as I can remember, there were 0 stripes in maintenance the year I was there. I came from Tyndall (Weapons Controller School) where the only things we had to work on was the UPA-35 and GPS-T4. I was there for the better part of 2 years and during that time, 2 A1C stripes were given: one to a guy that certainly deserved it and the other to the best smoocher I've ever encountered. There were certainly some techs that deserved the stripe, but I truly believe the majority who got them were the ones with the best lips. Also, I never saw an A1C on KP. I know now that it was for the best, but had I made that 3rd stripe, I would have been a lifer.


12/18/2009 00:00:00

Name: JOE SIMMS
Email: joesimms AT verizon.net

I was stationed at calumet afs in 1971 with Mark Manning ,ssgt starks, Max Robar, and an army guy named Pat Cluchey(sp). Used to
skate at the armory in Calumet and swim for about one minute in Lake Superior


12/18/2009 00:00:00

Name: phil harrison
Email: xpash1340 AT aol.com

forgot my password..need help setting up a new one Thank you
phil harrison


12/18/2009 00:00:00

Name: DALE COPELQAND
Email: daleec46 AT att.net

hELLO, to Norman Shafer From Dale Copeland, I was at the 777th from 65-68 and lived in B-Barracks on and off when I wasnt living off base with my wife . I worked in the Power Plant.After Klamath I went to the 738th in Olathe Kansas . On Radomes I met Al Zimmerman who was at the 738th before me. this Site Rocks, many thanks to the guys who keep us all together.


12/17/2009 00:00:00

Name: Gerry Segroves
Email: segrovesgg AT comcast.net

As a former radar operator and intercept control technician who has never seen Keesler or attended any Air Force tech school, let me say that we who were in ops -- at least most of us -- indeed DID appreciate our colleagues in radio and radar maintenance. And years and years later -- I just turned age 70 as I wrote this -- I still do. In short, we simply could not have done our jobs without 'em. And that includes the clerks, cooks, security policemen and other specialties in our squadrons, too. Before joining the AF in 1957 I used to hear an amateur radio operator tell other hams on the air that his home-brew kilowatt transmitter consisted mainly of "a pair of 807s running in a bucket of ice water." Today, let's keep our 807s cool, say thanks fellow vets, and all have a Merry Christmas.


12/17/2009 00:00:00

Name: John Tianen
Email: jtianen AT earthlink.net

I was surprised to read that Gerry Segroves did not attend tech school to learn to become a radar operator. Gerry...under what circumstances did you get to be a radar operator? Was it some kind of special or accelerated program? When I went through radar maintenance school in 1961-1962. there was a program that put techs straight into the field after only completing the basic electronics part of the program. They were supposed to learn the job through OJT. As I recall, there was a shortage of radar techs and they were experimenting with that approach to see if they could get techs trained without putting them through almost a year of school. I don't know how successful the program was. In my limited AF career, I never encountered another radar tech who went through that accelerated program.


12/17/2009 00:00:00

Name: Carl Wenberg
Email: zoombag AT comcast.net

Not to speak for Gerry, but my time as an operator 8+yrs. I trained a couple of cross trainees to our field by OJT, turned out very well. old story when I left Keesler and got to my 1st assignment was told by old timers to forget 1/2 what I was taught and learn it on the job the right way


12/17/2009 00:00:00

Name: Billy Brooks
Email: bdbrooks73 AT gmail.com

John Tianen: I knew two radar techs that came out of Cherry Tree (I think that's what it was called) One did not like radar maintenance at all and remaineded an A3C and got out of radar maintenance as soon as he could. The other one excelled and made E-4 in minimun TIG. Most of the techs in my time (61-65) never saw E-4. Not that I was of them, but the AF lost a lot of talented technicians because of the slow or no rank. I did not re-enlist because I was not coming back to the states as an E-3 and pull KP again. There were operators there with 48 or more in grade as an E-3. I don't know how they did it.




12/17/2009 00:00:00

Name: John Tianen
Email: jtianen AT earthlink.net

Billy Brooks...I can relate to the promotion situation for radar maintenance troops. When I was assigned to Saratoga AFS, there was a whole slew of A2C who had arrived from Keesler at about the same time (1962). I arrived in '63 after a year of overseas duty and having a 5 level. I had a lot of experience working at a manual AC&W site that a lot of the guys at Saratoga did not have. In Iceland, we had a small crew, and everybody worked on every piece of equipment. Many of the radar techs at Saratoga had only worked on a single piece of equipment. My roomate, for example, specialized on a simulator. That's all he ever worked on, nothing else. Others were nothing more than glorified clerks, scheduling and coordinating maintenance and radar downtime with the SAGE direction center. One guy ran the bowling alley. When the October '64 promotions came out, I was one of only a handfull or radar techs promoted to A1C. A lot of the guys who had come directly from Keesler were pissed off at me. I guess they thought that the stripe should have gone to them. The only reason I can think that I got the promotion was the fact that I had more overall experience than they had. Sadly, most of the radar techs at Saratoga did not make E-4 in their first 4 years. No reflection on them. It was just as you stated. Too few stripes for the numbers of men eligible. However, If you stated that you were going to re-enlist, then you MIGHT get your stripe. Sadly, the Air Force lost a lot of good men because of their lousy promotion policy during that time period. As for pulling KP, my First Sargeant assigned me to KP when I was an A1C with only about a month left before I was discharged. Another good reason why I didn't re-enlist.


12/17/2009 00:00:00

Name: Tom Page
Email: tepage AT hotmail.com

Billy Brooks: Just wondering if maybe you meant Cherry Point AFS (collated with Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point) near Havelock, NC? The Air Force's 614th AC&W Squadron (later 614th Radar Squadron) attended the radars there from 1958 until 1963. Just curious.


12/17/2009 00:00:00

Name: Dave Doyle
Email: d_am_ca AT hotmail.com

Served as a Rdr tech on four Cdn Pinetree sites (Ramore, Pagwa, Mont Apica, and St Sylvestre)plus two tours at North Bay in 'the hole'.I was also CGEO at Falconbridge.
Is there room in your organization for Canadian Airmen?


12/16/2009 00:00:00

Name: Carl Wenberg
Email: zoombag AT comcast.net

TOM: keep on rambling on you are doing and have done a GREAT job with this page, another "Scope Dope" 1954/63


12/15/2009 00:00:00

Name: Tom Page
Email: historian AT radomes.org

All comments are appreciated regarding *who* this web-based museum is for. It's for everybody. Like a physical museum, though, we have what we have, and we don't have what we don't have. That is, if something relevant is is not included here, the reason it is lacking is because we don't have the information. That is why we ping members and visitors alike from time to time seeking photos, yearbooks, site operational dates, site locations, and so on and so forth. We have amassed quite a bit of data over the past eleven years, but I'm sure there are still tons of stuff out there. And we are still learning, too. Like most of you, our own experiences were limited to just a few places and a few periods of time. We need all the assistance you can give and are willing to give. Our own knowledge is limited but growing.

My own active-duty Air Force experience began in August 1975 with a 8-month stay in Biloxi, MS (i.e., Keesler AFB). Little did I know then that the air-defense system I was about to get involved in had already been around for over thirty-five years -- longer than I had been alive! There was even an ADC radar station in my home town, yet I had no clue what really went on there. At my first duty station (Fort Fisher AFS), I caught on quickly, but still larned something new every day it seemed. I still recall a PACE flight in 1976 when our QC NCOIC mentioned we had a BOMARC on the scope. (It wasn't really a BOMARC missile -- those had already been decommissioned several years earlier -- it was the BOMARC symbology that was being used by the PACE aircraft to help distinguish it from other aircraft.) Anyway, my first question was, "What's a BOMARC?" Our QC NCOIC looked at me like I was stupid or something (and maybe I was, sort of), but that was the first time I had ever heard of them. Now, over thirty years later, I have learned quite a bit about BOMARC missiles and their launch sites, as well as about radar sites and control centers, but new stuff comes our way still. And, when it does, if it's within the scope of our on-line museum, we try to find a place on the website for the information, photos, or whatever. This is a work in progress, and always will be.

As I hinted before, you all can help. Whenever you find we are missing something, or have errors, please let us know. If you have photos of the sites, past or present, or yearbooks, or newspaper clippings, or newsletters, or simply information, or anything else of potential historical value, please send it to us by way of a donation or a loan, whichever. Please dig through your memorabilia, and help where you can. Thank you. (Sorry to ramble.) -- Tom


12/15/2009 00:00:00

Name: Mike Gawel
Email: Michael.Gawel AT dzsp21.com

Interested in abandoned "Milky Way' radar station, andersen AFB Guam.


12/14/2009 00:00:00

Name: Norman A. Shafer
Email: continental_o200 AT yahoo.com

Radar Operator, FPS-90/6, FPS-26 SAGE at 777th Radron, Klamath AFS, Requa, CA 1963 to 1966. It was a great time. My enlistment was up in Nov66 and I processed out of the Air Force from this location. Would'nt have traded it for the world. Hope Mike and Allen see this as well as anyone else I knew then. Anyone know Rick Housing from Sacremento CA??? He was my roommate there in the EM quarters. Have never heard from him since then.


12/14/2009 00:00:00

Name: John Tianen
Email: jtianen AT earthlink.net

I think all of us stationed at AC&W and radar sites, with the exception of the radar operators and weapons controllers, were in a support capacity. Some of us supported the primary mission closer than others. For example, radar maintenance was in very close support of the mission, while the drivers in the motor pool hall, while providing a vital function, were much more removed from the primary mission. I don't know what the beef is. We all served and did the jobs that the Air Force assigned us, and in our own way, we ALL supported the mission. We should all be proud of our service.


12/14/2009 00:00:00

Name: Jeff States
Email: psu68 AT psualum.com

Well put John. As one of those "radar operators" you mentioned, I now find myself as a member of a site (Radomes) that is mostly populated by former maintenance personnel. Although that limits my participation in many conversations, I never found in my 8 years in the Air Force that the radar operators/weapons controllers ever thought of support personnel as anything other than a co-equal part of an organization that had a job to accomplish.


12/13/2009 00:00:00

Name: Reed Shane
Email: rcs311 AT swayzee.com

Was stationed at Fort Lee AFS, Va. Worked the Washington Air Defense Sector. We had the AN/FSQ-7 IBM computer. Was there from Dec 62 thru May 65. Done anyone remember the site?


12/13/2009 00:00:00

Name: Billy Brooks
Email: bdbrooks73 AT gmail.com

First let me state that I was a 30352 radar maintenance technician during my enlistment. However, my post militay career was as an electronic technician/information management specialist with the federal governmennt................which was a support career. I fully understand how the prime movers tend to forget or overlook the folks who kept them working. I don't think this was/is an intentional oversight, but at times it was a very hurtful feeling to think you were not appreciated for your efforts in mission accomplishment. I hope all support folks realize that the mission could not have been completed without them.


12/10/2009 00:00:00

Name: Tom Page
Email: historian AT radomes.org

Hank Propp et al.: Sorry to read that you perceive that 304xx (Radio) and other non-radar troops feel short-changed on our website. Nothing of the sort is intended. Each radar site and SAGE DC that had a GATR site has as much information as we can find, including aerial images and photos. Our equipment listings mostly come from ADC records, which those list only the assigned radar types. ADC records exclude radios (e.g., GRT-3, GRR-7; GRT-22, GRR-24, GRC-171; GKA-5, FRT-49, etc.); data transmitters (e.g., FST-1, FST-2, FYQ-47, FYQ-49); ALRI; troposcatter comm.; etc. However, we do include most of these in our Equipment pages. We encourage everyone who ever served on a radar site, ADCC, SAGE DC / CC, BOMARC site, NCMC, etc. to sign the Guestbook and the applicable Site Rosters. This web-based museum is for everyone who served. Henry, if you have any other concerns, please e-mail me directly. If you have listings of what radio types were installed at what sites, please send that information, too. Thanks. -- Tom


12/08/2009 00:00:00

Name: ROBERT BUTTS
Email: ber691 AT stny.rr.com

Tonopah was great duty to some, and to others it was hell, I personally enjoyed my tour in Tonopah 57 to 58


12/08/2009 00:00:00

Name: Hank Propp
Email: hpropp AT twcny.rr.com

After reading over your url, I think you have done excellent job in outlining the history and evolution of the worlds AC&W efforts. Even though I am do not have a radar back ground, I have a back of ground radio through the time period of 1951-1970s, that was 304X0. During this period and I and others like me were as a part of this history as were any of radar operations and maintenance people were. We were always at every radar station, we were radio maintenance personnel.

The first unit out of radio school I was assigned was the 118th AC&W Squadron, first located as Seward AB and transfered as a unit to the radar build up in North Africa, it later became the 736 AC&W which was dotted all over the area of French Morraco.

I was then transfer to the First Communication Squadron Radio and Radar) at Griffis AFB in 1953. This squadron and its sister squadron 22nd Communications Contruction Squadron (Telephone and Wire Maintenance) I believe were the real predecessor to GEEIA also orginally at Griffis AFB too. Our main tasks during the early 1950s were to build AC&W squadrons both in Greenland, Canada, Japan and the United States. We also build the communications for larger bases.

I also sever at Lincoln Labs (MIT) and later MITRE Corporation in develpment of troposcatter communication systems for the Texas Tower so they would have communications with CC at 21st Air Force at Stewart AFB. We then developed a Long distance (700 miles)to support the BEMEWS systems which was later called the AN/FPS-47 and was part of the BMEWS Alpha communications systems.

Later I served at both in the 34th and 21st Air Divisions as part of the DM's Quality Control office and inspection team. We were team members during PEGE Flights and inspection tours of all AC&W squadron in each Air Division. I was reponsible for the GATA sites and the Maintence Control Center (MCC) for maintenance quality control and record maintenance, AFM 66-1 compliance.

I think our contributions have been largly overlook by the Air Defense Radar Museum, we were equal contributors with the Radar types, neither of us could have completed the mission without each other.

With Respect and Sincerely,

Henry Propp


12/08/2009 00:00:00

Name: jon henrich
Email: uman AT aol.com

Was stationed at tonopah sitefrom 1956-1957, looking for memories.


12/08/2009 00:00:00

Name: BILL WELLS
Email: bdwells AT suddenlink.net

WHILE STATIONED AT THE 768TH AT MORIARTY NM NUMEROUS SIGHTING WERE SEEN ON THE SCOPES. BUT WHEN REPORTED THEY WERE IGNORED.
BUT...ONE NIGHT AT THE MOBILE HOME PARK ON THE SITE ABOUT 30 OF US SAW AN OBJECT TO THE NORTH OF OUR PICNIC AREA WITH A TRAIL OF FIRE BEHIND IT.ONE OF THE AIRMEN AT THE PICNIC CALLED DOWN AND INQUIRED ABOUT WHAT WE WERE SEEING. HE WAS TOLD "NOTHING".
THE VERY NEXT DAY TWO OFFICERS FROM BLUEBOOK CAME AND INTERVIED EVERYONE AT THE COOKOUT. WE WERE TOLD WE SAW NOTHING AND FORGET IT. BUT 30 FOLKS SAW WHAT I JUST RELATED....BILL


12/07/2009 00:00:00

Name: John Magee
Email: jmagee5 AT cox.net

Dad was Stationed at Point Arena from 67-69. We lived on the base in 1969. You have a fantastic site here!!!!


12/07/2009 00:00:00

Name: david a schmelzer
Email: mad-b AT comcast.net

stationed at murphy dome 1974 radar operator


12/07/2009 00:00:00

Name: Carl Wenberg
Email: zoombag AT comcast.net

U2 Memories, Ger. 1955 u2s out of Weisbaden flown by NACA before AF took them over, then they went to Giebelstadt, Ger. handled many classified flts of U2s while in ger. also worked a UHF/ net control station there when a U2 went down and we got a class A fix on him so they located wreckage in record time, was at Air Control Center 807th Tac Cont. SQ 501st Tac Cont Grp. 12th AF , also worked U2s overflt. Cuba when AF took over Radar at NAS Key West 1961/62 exciting times


12/07/2009 00:00:00

Name: Howard Phillips
Email: h_j_phillips AT hotmail.com

I was assigned to the 690t/135th AC&W Sqdn at Kirtland AFB in 1951-52 and Tierra Amarilla 52/53. At both units my job was in Movements/Identification. The twelve of us who made-up the Identification Section at the 690th/135th were tasked with Identifying airborne objects and had the added duty of receiving and copying UFO reports called-in by the general public. During my time in this job I received/copied many UFO Reports- Nothing came of any of them as far as I know. I am a "Non-Believer" in the darn things. Being a former Missourian- I believe in nothing I hear and only half of what I see, but Colonel Bill Matheny (34th AD Commander) was a firm believer in
UFO's-And empty Butt Cans.

Howard-


12/05/2009 00:00:00

Name: HankB
Email: b1347hwb16w AT optonline.net

Jeff....Lest we all forget, the U-2 was fully operational long before.


12/05/2009 00:00:00

Name: John Tianen
Email: jtianen AT earthlink.net

The History Channel once did a story on the Kecksburg, PA UFO incident that happened in 1965. The 662nd Radar Squadron at Oakdale, PA supposedly sent a team to investigate. The History Channel and others who have reported on that story often refer to the 662nd as an Army installation. My recollection of the History Channel story is that it showed supposed Air Force people dressed in Army uniforms. When you see stupid errors like that, you can't help but question the complete story. I will only believe UFO stories when I see Elvis and Michael Jackson step out of the UFO from which they were kidnapped. That is what really happened to them you know. I read it in a supermarket tabloid.


12/05/2009 00:00:00

Name: Thomas F. Dowd
Email: roadkill4me AT aol.com

911th AC&W site N. Concord, VT 1959-1961 looking for those who were assigned and still living.


12/04/2009 00:00:00

Name: Tom Page
Email: historian AT radomes.org

AP News Item (4 Dec 2009): UK's [Ministry of Defence] "MoD has shut UFO investigation unit" -- source http://www.google.com/hostednews/ukpress/article/ALeqM5hBWaLoPauKnt4iXcGeUTqWL-46Ew (and others). Among the statements, "... The MoD said it had received thousands of reports of UFOs over more than 50 years, but none revealed any evidence of a potential threat to the UK or substantial proof of the existence of extra-terrestrials. ..."

I mention this news item partly because the U.S. Air Force once had a similar UFO investigative program known as "Project Blue Book." There was even a TV show about it back in the 1960s, I believe it was. Reportedly, "Project Blue Book" likewise turned up no credible UFO or extra-terrestrials evidence.

I also mention it partly because our own radar stations, from time to time, would receive phone calls from civilians saying they had witnessed a UFO. Maybe some of you radar operators answered such phone calls? Anyone have any good "war stories" on the subject? Thanks.


12/04/2009 00:00:00

Name: Jeff States
Email: psu68 AT psualum.com

Re Tom's UFO story request. Circa 1960-1962---790 Radar Squadron, Kirksville, MO. As a LRR site reporting to a SAGE "DC," I would occasionally operate our FPS-6A height finders manually during midnight shifts looking for "whatever." Numerous times I would find an object or objects at 70,000 to 75,000 feet. Knowing that we had nothing capable of flying at that altitude (or so I thought), I was always positive that I had found something of interest. I would notify the "DC," but always received the same answer---don't worry about it, there is nothing there. All these years later, and with the help of Google, it is clear that we had aircraft being flight tested at that time (example---the SR-71 Blackbird) that could reach those previously mentioned altitudes. It doesn't seem like much now, but at the time it was very exciting and surely helped pass the time on the midnight shift.