Online Air Defense Radar Museum Guestbook

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Welcome to the Online Air Defense Radar Museum. We hope you enjoy your visit, and that we have contributed a little something in the name of those who served.  Gene.

Please consider joining our new radar museum organization, The Air Force Radar Museum Association, Inc. AFRMA is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt non-profit Ohio Corporation. Our sole purpose is the creation and support of the National Air Defense Radar Museum at Bellefontaine, Ohio. Please visit our home page to join or donate to this cause. AFRMA, Inc. - The Air Force Radar Museum Association, Inc.. Follow the "Memberships" link on the AFRMA home page.



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2004

06/30/2004 00:00:00

Name: Bill Wells
Email: bdwells AT lakecountry.net

Tom--when I went to Las Cruces in 1956 all building were quonset huts.And that is the mess hall building U refered to.The Main Gate was a plywood shack with plexiglass windows.The area was hot dry dusty windy and snaky.I really didnt much like it there.The water tower was wood and overflowed everyday.Guys would get under it in bathing suits and wash their cars or just to cool off.There was no air conditioning there except at HQ


06/30/2004 00:00:00

Name: Jim Petitt
Email: gympet AT aol.com

Gene & Tom, unable to contact you. AOL says you email address is to long.


06/30/2004 00:00:00

Name: Edward Franklin
Email: erfranklin AT hotmail.com

Hey Guys - the negativity surrounding the post of political issues here at radomes.org needs to subside. I would imagine the people posting the political statement comes from frustration in our world today & this is their only way of sounding out since they don`t have access to the news media or a radio talk show. Remember that all of us fought for this right to dissent regardless of the side one identifies with. Don`t take away that right from one who has served side-by- side with each of us in our effort to keep this country free. Granted some of the comments seem a bit heated & slighted but our comrades have the right to speak. What needs to occur is to structure the comments in a constructive manner and not point, or assail any political party because they did not cause the turmoil alone. I have to place any blame on our Congress (Senate & house of Representatives) regardless of party affiliation as they have not completed their task `for the people, by the people, and of the people`. We can all mumble & grumble but the Voting Booth is where each of us makes our statement; and thank God we still have the vote for Federal, State, County and City. Learn and grow from this and make the politicans pay attention; don`t leave it up to someone else. God Bless America! Happy Independence Day!!!!!


06/29/2004 00:00:00

Name: Ernest A. Haygood
Email: ernest.haygood AT wpafb.af.mil

I was the last executive officer for the 754th Radar Squadron Commander, Lt Col George L. `Butch` Theisen III, at the Port Austin AFS MI facility. This was from January 1987 to December 1988. The site closed down for good in 1989. Is there anyone out there who was stationed at Port Austin AFS at tha time? I`d like to correspond with you.


06/29/2004 00:00:00

Name: GARY J. MITCHELL
Email: GOXRX AT AOL.COM

GREAT SITE....WAS STATIONED IN DICKINSON, ND AS A RADAR TECH 1962-65. HELPED CLOSE DOWN THE 706TH. SAD DAYS. WOULD LIKE TO GET IN TOUCH WITH ANY REMAINING MEMBERS FROM 706TH. HAD GOOD FRIENDS IN ALL CAREERS AND WOULD BE INTERESTED IN CORRESPONDING WITH ANYONE INTERESTED. (MOTOR POOL, SUPPLY, NCO CLUB, ADMIN, SCOPE DOPES, CHOW HALL, ETC.


06/29/2004 00:00:00

Name: Dick Murphy
Email: rmurph AT att.net

Read a earlier post ranting about Republicans not being diligent about a possible terrorist attack. 1- Who turned down Bin Laden when offered? 2- Who did nothing about WTC in `93(believe it was `93) 3-What administration looked the other way and actually helped N.Korea develop a nuclear program. 4-Who did nothing about the Cole? 5-Who basically `kicked the can` down the road as this country was threatened, and attacked. 6- Who demeaned the office of the Presidency, and commited despicable acts in our house, the White House, and of all sacred places, the Oval Office. 7- Who will go down in history, as a convicted perjurer, and a mediocre President, at best, who belittled the office, neglected his duties, and emboldened our enemies. Yes, the answer to the above is the Democratic administration of Bill Clinton. Who has faced the threats against our country and our way of life?.....Yes, George Bush, has lived up to the responsibilties of the officed, and made the tough decisions. Yes, It was ironic, and fitting, that the earlier protesters handle......was .......Looney,.... I agree.


06/29/2004 00:00:00

Name: r frame
Email: rframe AT otelco.net

why dont some of these ding dongs that are writing political `b-S` keep off this site.this site isnt here for some one to preach their political ideas. if its political keep it to yourself.


06/29/2004 00:00:00

Name: Jeff States
Email: psu68 AT psualum.com

If it wasn`t for Tom or Gene`s occasional polite `reminder emails,` a small percentage of `visitors` might assume that this is space for inappropriate political commentary. For those few, remember that this is a web site dedicated to those who served in defense of North American air space during the Cold War. Tom...thanks for your email of 6/28. Now let`s get back to radar...it is politically neutral!!


06/28/2004 00:00:00

Name: Ralph "duke" Looney, Col USAF
Email: dukelooney AT sbcglobal.net

Ref:FreeRepublic.com, MILITARY UNPREPARED FOR 9/11 ATTACKS What was the date that President, Vice President, Joint Chiefs of Staffs deleted the all the USAF Radar Sites, and to the Control & Command the FAA. PRESIDENT BUSH WILL BE DEFEATED


06/28/2004 00:00:00

Name: Phil Rowe
Email: parowejr AT juno.com

This old B-52 ECM type fondly remembers practice runs against NW US radar sites. http://philrowe.net may be of some interest. Thanks for your fine site.


06/28/2004 00:00:00

Name: Tom Page
Email: tepage AT hotmail.com

Regarding the note about closing USAF radar stations and turning them over to the FAA, that occurred in the 1979 time frame, which was under the Jimmy Carter administration. Wasn`t he a Democrat? Let`s keep the museum politically neutral, okay? Thanks!


06/26/2004 00:00:00

Name: Norman C Smith
Email: ncsmith1 AT comcast.net

Looking for a Sgt M.K.Engram. Does anyone out there know him or his where he is now?


06/24/2004 00:00:00

Name: Walt Sellars
Email: sellars5 AT aol.com

Looking for anyone stationed at Saglek AFS, Labradore 1969-70, also 623 ADCC Naha AB Okinawa 71-73. Thanks CMSgt (Ret) Cheyenne Mt NORAD 1996


06/23/2004 00:00:00

Name: Dale Robinson
Email: delarobinson AT yahoo.com

I was stationed at the 766th Radar Squadron (Caswell AFS) from early 1974 until late 1976. I worked at the GATR site. I still work on some of the same equipment today for the FAA.


06/22/2004 00:00:00

Name: Terry Donaldson
Email: TDonald36 AT aol.com

649th Radar Sqd 1958.


06/20/2004 00:00:00

Name: Bill Wells
Email: bdwells AT lakwcountry.net

Is there any site info on the 768th at Moriarty? Thanks--and thanks for 767th-enjoyed it-brought back memories!


06/19/2004 00:00:00

Name: Bill Wells
Email: bdwells AT lakecountry.net

Is there a site roster for the 767th at Tierra Amarila NM? If so PLESE let me know----Many thanks BW


06/19/2004 00:00:00

Name: Tom Bower
Email: bower AT camasnet.com

Hey Gene and Tom, Thanks for adding those pictures and notes of the Cottonwood Id. A.F.S. I sent you. I hope they are a help with this museum. Any questions I can help you with please e-mail me. Tom B.


06/18/2004 00:00:00

Name: Bob Workman
Email: w148 AT hotmail.com

Just want tell all Remote Radar folks who want to see what Cape Newenham was like, the site is open just go to www.msnusers.com/capenewenham Over 1000 pictures of the 794 Ac&w


06/18/2004 00:00:00

Name: Ken Fornwalt
Email: kfornwal AT rma.army.mil

For all you folks out there that went to basic training at Sampson AFB, NY, here`s a website for you to take a look back.. http://www.sampsonvets.com


06/17/2004 00:00:00

Name: Dr. Breazile
Email: jamedwd AT okstate.edu

just searching for information.


06/17/2004 00:00:00

Name: Bill Wells
Email: bdwells AT lakecountry.net

I was on the north site (767th) from may 54 to 56--South site at Las Cruces from 56 to 57-East site at Moriarty (768th) from 57 to 58-looking for raymond tate who was at the 767th


06/17/2004 00:00:00

Name: Louis Jennings
Email: Helennlou62852 AT aol.com

Hello, Anyone out there from GEEIA squadron? or any radar sites? Send me an E-mail, I`d like to hear from you.


06/14/2004 00:00:00

Name: George Wallot
Email: gwallot AT hotmail.com

Proudly served with the US Army in the 194th Ord Det, Ft Richardson, Alaska 1963/1964. I was a tracking radar repairman in the Nike Improved Hercules Air Defense System.


06/13/2004 00:00:00

Name: Bob Caggiano
Email: rcaggian AT ptd.net

Attention all 641st or Melville AFS personnel! If you have any memories, stories or photos pertaining to the AFRS radio station at Melville, please contact me. I am starting a new web page on the Melville Air Station website just for old DJ`s like you! I`ve got some great information that just came to me about the station, but am looking for more people who contributed their time to make life more pleasant for others. Looking forward to hearing from you! Bob Caggiano - http://melvilleairstation.tripod.com/ rcaggian@ptd.net


06/12/2004 00:00:00

Name: Jeff States
Email: psu68 AT psualum.com

The long week is over and a former commander-in-chief has been laid to rest. The US military performed magnificently...standing `straight and tall,` dressed in their finest, they added dignity and honor to the week`s proceedings. It makes one proud.


06/12/2004 00:00:00

Name: Eric DiDomenico
Email: edidomenico AT integrity-apps.com

First, thanks to all of you who defended my country - so I could grow up to do the same in a free Nation. Losing President Reagan this week reminds me of the great Americans who served to preserve the blessings I enjoy. Again, thank you! I`m a retired USAF officer now serving Civil Air Patrol (Official USAF Auxiliary) as the Aerospace Education Officer for Leesburg Squadron in Virginia. I stumbled across your site when researching for lessons to present to cadets for summer encampment. Thanks for the treasure of history here - and thanks again for all you did and continue to do.


06/09/2004 00:00:00

Name: Rick Samuel
Email: fotoz45 AT earthlink.net

I was assigned to the Gapfiller Radar Section at Ft. Fisher AFS, NC between 1964 and 1968. The ADC records are incorrect as to the decommissioning of the three (3) sites that were supported. I was reassigned to Kotzebue Alaska in Jan of 1968 and passed through Ft Fisher in June 1969 in route to Patrick AFB. As I understand it, the gapfiller radar sites were officially decomissioned in late 1968 or early 1969 as the BUIC system came on line. The three sites were Holly Ridge (Hwy 17 on the old training site of Camp Davis (FPS 14 and FST-1), Windy Hill (not Myrtle Beach)off of Hwy 17 at the entrance to the Arrowhead Campground (turn left at Watsons Grocery) (FPS -14 and FST-1) and the final site at Ft. Bragg on Cooliecouch (pronounced KOLICOOCH) Mountain (FPS - 18 and FST-1) The range of the gapfiller radar systems was set to 60 nautical miles - not 65 as indicated on the site spec sheet. The raw radar data was processed by the FST-1 Computer system and the output was reduced to 48 nautical miles as SDV (Slowed Down Video). From the T-1, the signal was processed by CPE (Customer Premise Equipment) belonging to Bell South and transmitted over telephone lines to the prime site (Ft. Fisher) where it was processed and integrated into the FST-2 SAGE computer system. The gapfiller sites may have been manned up until 1962 and the decomissioning date used by ADC. From 1964 until actual decomissioning, the sites were unmanned execpt during elevated threat levels or exercises. Thanks Richard W. Samuel MSGT, USAF Retired


06/08/2004 00:00:00

Name: Scot A LaPine
Email: sal41855 AT yahoo.com

Hello all, Verty good site. I was an 303X2 from 1973 till 1977 when I fell from the 26 tower at Blaine AFS. This brings back alot of merories. Keep up the good work!


06/08/2004 00:00:00

Name: Bruce Wayne
Email: Bat.net AT

On Everyone`s Radar: New Uses for Evolving Military Radar Technology By Gregory M. Lamb June 7, 2004 — Far from being an antique curiosity of World War II, radar technology today has become smaller, cheaper, easier to manufacture, and more powerful. Modern radars can look beneath the Egyptian desert from an orbiting spacecraft and see ancient riverbeds and ruins. From miles away, they can peer through clouds or fog to figure out what a ship at dock looks like by sensing patterns from its rocking motion. They soar overhead in small, unmanned planes to give military commanders a live picture of a battlefield in any weather, day or night. Yet the most surprising accomplishment of this military-driven technology may be its steady move into civilian life. Already, people barely notice when radar calls a fault at tennis tournaments or delivers a more accurate weather forecast. So hold onto your radar detectors, scientists say. There`s much more to come as military breakthroughs spark creative new ideas for civilian use — from making seven-day forecasts as accurate as today`s two-day predictions to building cars that warn lane-changing drivers of a car they can`t see. In the military, radar remains the backbone of America`s missile-defense system. `[Radar] does everything from large-scale surveillance to identifying a specific threatening object and actually guiding the kill-vehicle [missile] to it,` says Rick Yuse, vice president of the missile-defense program at Raytheon, a major U.S. defense contractor. Today`s technology is allowing powerful radars to be built that would have been unimaginable to scientists who built giant radar towers in the late 1930s to defend Britain`s coastline. But while giant missile-defense radars, such as the BMEWS systems, may mushroom to 10 or 12 stories tall, much of the most exciting research in radar is thinking small. Just coming on line for aircraft, for example, is Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar, a fully electronic radar with no mechanical moving parts that can track many targets and guide missiles to those targets simultaneously. It is operating on just 18 US Air Force F-15s. There are plans to equip 161 more F-15s and other military aircraft in the future. AESA is `stealthier` and more reliable than older radars and may eventually be put to use helping to intercept cruise missiles. Some evidence suggests it is powerful enough to knock out ground-based radars if its beam is concentrated on a narrow spot. That task, though, is expected to be handled mostly by the military`s new Thor radar-jamming system, expected to be available in 2008. Another radar in the works, the mini-SAR, has gained tremendous attention in recent months. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR), often called `imaging radar` because of its ability to show stationary objects with almost photographic clarity, has been used in reconnaissance aircraft like the U-2 for years. Now scientists at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M., are miniaturizing it to fit into the tiny unmanned Shadow aerial vehicle, not much bigger than a model airplane. SAR images are nothing like the smears of light seen on early radar screens. With a mini-SAR, weighing less than 30 pounds, the Shadow could distinguish two Coke cans standing only inches apart from several miles away, says George Sloan, the miniSAR project leader at Sandia. And many radar images must be interpreted by an image analyst. Not so with SAR, Sloan says. That means troops can view images themselves and act quickly. `I can show these images to my 10-year-old son, and he`ll be able to identify a car, a truck, a building, or whatever,` Sloan says. The group hopes to flight test the miniSAR in early 2005. Eventually, Sloan says, the miniSARs might be small enough, and cheap enough, to be put inside precision-guided bombs, for use when guidance systems such as GPS are not practical or are being jammed. But no matter how much radar is doing now, military planners want it to do more. One of the great interests today is in a radar system that can see through foliage, which can be used to hide enemy positions, says Doc Dougherty, chief scientist at Raytheon`s Space and Airborne Systems in El Segundo, Calif. He calls it a `very hard problem` to solve. Others see great potential in space-based radars on satellites, which could fill in the information gaps other radars miss. And Sandia is also working on radar `tags` that could be mounted on military vehicles, and perhaps eventually attached to every soldier, to identify them as `friendly` forces when they are tracked by their own radars, cutting down on fatalities from friendly fire. A number of challenges remain, including cutting the cost and preventing enemy forces from disabling, employing, or imitating the sensors. Meanwhile, in the civilian realm, automakers are exploring radar as the next big thing in safety. Toyota is putting a radar-based precollision system into its Lexus LS430 luxury sedan. A split second after the onboard radar detects an imminent collision, the car tightens the seat belts around passengers and begins braking. By the 2007 model year, at least one major carmaker also will be using radar to help drivers change lanes safely, says Scott Pyles, a spokesman for Valeo Raytheon Systems in Auburn Hills, Mich., which is manufacturing the device. It`s based on phased-array radars developed for the military. The unit is mounted in the rear of the car beneath the surface, making it immune to damage from rain, salt, snow, or ice. Side collisions, caused when drivers fail to see another vehicle in their `blind spot` during a lane change, account for more than 413,000 auto accidents per year and injure more than 160,000 people, Pyles says. When the Valeo system detects another vehicle or a pedestrian in the driver`s blind spot, it activates a LED warning display on the driver`s side-view mirror. `It`s a very reliable technology, and you can use it in all weather,` he says. He expects `you`ll see the price in the $500 to $600 range` or as part of luxury-option packages. The same technology could also be used to provide assistance in backing up and parking, he says. Further down the road, `long-range` radar may be used to determine the speed of approaching vehicles for situations such as merging into freeway traffic or judging whether a turn across traffic can be made safely. And it`s beginning to be used to monitor traffic on freeways, giving traffic planners a real-time view of the number of vehicles, congestion, average speeds, even the sizes of vehicles on the road. Radar`s reliability and ability to `see` in any weather make it an attractive alternative to video cameras. Radar already has brought huge improvements to weather forecasting. Now its newer cousin, `lidar,` which uses laser light instead of radio waves, may make even more accurate predictions possible. Unlike radar, lidar has the ability to measure winds without any particulates, such as water vapor, making it able to track so-called clear air. `Measuring upper atmospheric winds is the No. 1 missing ingredient for making long-term weather forecasts,` says Peter Tchoryk, executive vice president of Michigan Aerospace Corporation in Ann Arbor, which is developing a lidar system for doing just that. With funds from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Tchoryk`s company has built ground stations in New Hampshire and Hawaii to test the lidar weather-tracking system. The next step is to launch a high-altitude balloon with lidar to 100,000 feet, a final test before putting the weather tracker into a spacecraft. From there, it could monitor movements of large weather systems and predict their wind flows. As a result, seven-day weather forecasts would be just as accurate as today`s two-day forecasts. `It has long-term impacts in terms of agriculture [and] storm and hurricane prediction,` Tchoryk says, `not to mention the military aspects of being able to forecast winds.` Lidar is also being used by law enforcement officers to track speeders on busy highways, where its focused beam lets it easily pick out individual vehicles.--The Christian Science Monitor, Inc.


06/06/2004 00:00:00

Name: Clarence Strack
Email: claredie AT aol.com

762nd


06/06/2004 00:00:00

Name: Jeff States
Email: psu68 AT psualum.com

The Air Force `Cold-War Warriors` who visit this site stand and salute in awe of those who, 60 years ago, went to war...and changed the world. Later, we served our time and performed our duty by standing on their broad shoulders. Words are inadequate…remembering is our ultimate tribute.


06/06/2004 00:00:00

Name: Harvey Hartman
Email: harvey.hartman AT txelli.ang.af.mil

I agree with John Tianen (5 June, below.) It didn`t matter whether you were a Democrat or Republican, almost everyone liked Mr. Reagan. And for us Cold Warriors, he was our leader during the peak of the Cold War. He was, without a doubt, my favorite Commander in Chief. America will miss him!


06/06/2004 00:00:00

Name: Edward Franklin
Email: erfranklin AT hotmail.com

Thanks to John Tianen for the comment regarding President Ronald Reagan. He was without a doubt a great President and did many things for the American serviceman. May God bless and care for him. A thousand salutes to you Dutch!!


06/05/2004 00:00:00

Name: John Tianen
Email: jtianen AT earthlink.net

Today, America lost a great patriot and leader, Ronald Reagan. In his open letter to the American people after learning he had Alzheimer`s disease, he wrote `When the Lord calls me home, whenever that might be, I will leave with the greatest love for this country of ours and eternal optimism for its future. I know that for America there will always be a bright dawn ahead.` May he rest in peace.


06/05/2004 00:00:00

Name: Steve Weatherly
Email: lweatherly4 AT comcast.net

Ran across information about the Montauk radar site (773 Radar Squadron) and a strange story about the Montauk Project. http://www.tricountyi.net/~randerse/montauk1.htm. No comment on the project story, but at the conclusion is an interesting overview of a `real` trip to Montauk in 1991. Reads like an archeology report about a lost city. For example, it is reported that the (FPS-35) radar antenna still moved in the wind because the drive motors had been removed. Also observations about waveguide status and other anomolies.


06/03/2004 00:00:00

Name: Paul Terrell
Email: PTerrell1 AT aol.com

I live in El Cajon, California and camp near AFS, Mount Laguna and have wondered of its history. What the buildings orginally looked like and any interesting facts about the base. Thank you! Great site! Very informative.


06/03/2004 00:00:00

Name: Robert D. Reed
Email: robfran AT yahoo.com

I was a tech rep on the SAGE system at the 859th Sage site


06/03/2004 00:00:00

Name: Terry Stratton
Email: edutech2 AT hotmail.com

736 AC&W.. Nouasseur AFB Morocco... Aug 1961-Dec 1961....


06/02/2004 00:00:00

Name: Col. Ray Kleber USAF (Ret)
Email: modelman AT nc.rr.com

There is an addition being built to the present museum at the Wasserkuppe. It will be completed in Sept 2004. The folks would like photos, newspaper articles & memorabilia from the 616th AC&W Sqdn to be displayed there. One Radome will remain as a tribute to the years of dedicated service the USAF men & women served in defense of the West German Nation. Time is short. Please look through your scrap books. If you have something to offer, please contact me at 695 New Hope Rd. Goldsboro, NC 27534, 919-778-4211 Any help is appreciated. Col. K


06/02/2004 00:00:00

Name: David Denchel USN Ret.
Email: hils3rd AT msn.com

When I was growing up in E.Washington State. There was this modest little Radar station just S. of Othello WA. We refered to it as Radar Hill. We had to drive by there on the way to Seattle.